Increase in Calls to Poison Center Points to Child E-Cig Exposur - KULR8.com | News, Weather & Sports in Billings, Montana

Increase in Calls to Poison Center Points to Child E-Cig Exposure

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The liquid nicotine inside electronic cigarettes can be harmful if accidentally come in contact with it. The liquid nicotine inside electronic cigarettes can be harmful if accidentally come in contact with it.
KENNEWICK, WA- The Washington Poison Center reported a 600% increase in calls relating to electronic cigarettes this year.

The Washington Poison Center reported that the majority of the calls they received about e-cigs were related to children between one and three-years-old making that age group 85% of cases concerning children.

The Benton-Franklin Health District said this is a problem, but for users, there is no current evidence that electronic cigarettes do in fact cause health problems.  They said they still have nicotine in them and that it has the same effects as the nicotine in a regular cigarette, which does in fact cause some health problems.

“We know some of the ingredients can be carcinogenic, which means cancer causing.  Just like regular cigarettes, many of them still have nicotine, which is still an addictive substance,” said Susan Shelton, Benton-Franklin Health District Environmental Health Specialist.

Because of the nicotine in the devices, they want parents to be careful about leaving them out.  Kids may accidentally get into the liquid nicotine inside the e-cigs and can be very poisonous for them, which has caused the increase in poison control calls.

Even though more research is still being done, the local health departments, cities, and counties have put in more strict regulations when it comes to e-cigs.

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