These Guys Work In The Heat So You Don't Have To - KULR-8 Television, Billings, MT

These Guys Work In The Heat So You Don't Have To

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When temperatures get this hot we all have our ways of staying cool, but for some workers it's their job to keep you cool. When temperatures get this hot we all have our ways of staying cool, but for some workers it's their job to keep you cool.
 NBCRightNow.com - When temperatures get this hot we all have our ways of staying cool, but for some workers it's their job to keep you cool.

If you're outdoors working the heat is on your mind. It can be tough to keep things cool when your job is so hot

"It feels cool, once you get outside. It might be 100 degrees but it feels pretty nice outside," explained Blake Kentch of Bob Rhodes Heating & Air Conditioning.

Kentch is a service technician so while he gets paid to make sure your climate is controlled he's working in an environment with little to no control over how hot it can get.

"Suffer for the better of other people I guess. You get stuck up in there. You come down for a half hour or better and it's brutal," said Kentch.

This time of year he can be outdoors working on your unit where there's somewhat of a breeze. There’s also the dreaded hot attic.

"I've had my thermometer up in there and you get upwards of 130 (degrees) up in there. You come down and you're just totally soaked."

Kentch says he averages about 2 gallons of water these days. Construction workers outside often drench their clothes in buckets of water. At Hanford, tank farm workers are on tropical hours to escape the heat. At Tropical Sno Hawaiian Ice in Kennewick a good sturdy tent kept Scott Neel cool as he painted his stand.

"I don’t have one so this is my hat," said Neel who grew up on a ranch working through the dog days of summer. He said he's just conditioned to deal with the heat. If he just can’t handle it he sometimes snacks on his merchandise. "Quick shaved ice, is always nice."

The workers are usually out in the heat so we don't have to suffer. For both of them it's going to be a long week and an even longer summer. When we asked how they’ll get through it they explained, “day by day!”
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